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princess.

April 5, 2009

Pretty much every girl my age (or really any girl) remembers watching the Disney princess movies (Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Little Mermaid, Snow White, etc). Except those kids with parents who think like this. Apparently all the pink and princess hype is a bad influence, creating gender stereotypes and racism. Yes, the all-white casts could be troubling, but that’s not just a Disney princess problem. Yes, there is a huge emphasis on beauty, but that’s also not just Disney princesses. Yes, the damsel-in-distress character is pretty helpless, but given their circumstances, I’d be looking for someone to help me out too.

Guess what? Little kids don’t know that; they would never even think of those problems. A kid isn’t going to watch Cinderella and feel a need to be blond. Ariel, the little mermaid, and Jasmine, the Arabian princess, aren’t going to make her feel like her waist should be half the size of her head. Those self-esteem issues will be coming from a million other places. Why not focus on the fact that good always prevails over evil? Or that the stories are often about achieving your dreams? Or that they’re probably the reason most of us want to fall in love? That’s the good stuff, the obvious stuff. Not any of this “finding problems where they don’t exist” crap.

And pink? It’s a color. Most people associate pink with girls and Barbie and princesses, but who cares? I associate brown with poop, but it doesn’t make me feel bad for wearing it or liking it. And now more than ever, guys are wearing more pink (why? because it looks good, despite it’s feminine connotations). Training kids to be averse to pink and princesses – when all their girl-friends are obsessed – is probably worse for them than watching the movies. They’ll feel awkward or out-of-the-loop, which doesn’t really help the self-esteem.

Besides, there are so many worse cultural things out there (like Gossip Girl or the Twilight series). If you need to “protect” them from Disney movies, they’ll never be able to leave the house when they’re a teenager.

Piece of trivia update: Apparently, in the early 1900s, pink was more of a male color because it was stronger, while blue is daintier and therefore more feminine.

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2 comments

  1. […] July 10, 2009, 6:58 pm Filed under: Uncategorized I’ve already said my piece about princess movies. But with Pixar’s recent announcement of their new future princess movie, there’s been […]


  2. Checked out that other link, she seems more pissed about the lack of non-white princesses than anything else.

    I never understood the feminism argument against these movies. Look, the princesses aren’t taking charge because these stories are from like the 1500s. They can’t act like women from the 1960s onwards.

    Also, most of the newer tales feature women who were not helpless. Ariel is rebellious against her father. Jasmine escapes the palace, confronts Jafar and her father, and refuses to be married to anyone except the man SHE chooses. In Hercules, Meg had a pretty tough exterior. In Mulan she f*cking joins the military and SAVES the captian of the army. So anyone who’s complaining hasn’t seen the recent stuff.



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